Thursday, 31 January 2013

DJANGO UNCHAINED

I know, I know, I'm a bit late to the party with this one (not as late as I am to the Argo party, since I'm not seeing that until Friday) but whatever. I liked this film. I didn't love it and I didn't like all of it, but overall I liked it.

The story was strong, the script was excellent and there wasn't a weak link in the acting. I mean, it's no Reservoir Dogs, but it runs rings around Pulp Fiction. And it's funny. Very funny. I know that's a hotly contested comment, with allegations of racism surrounding this film since before it even appeared in cinemas, but I think it was funny. I saw an article that listed the ten most offensive moments in Django, and I disagreed with most of their choices. The language used seems to be a particular issue. Now, I have issues with language myself, I don't understand why some swear-words are considered worse than others, I don't understand why it's okay for a black person to use the n-word but then get offended if a white person does. (I understand why it's an offensive word, I just think if it is that offensive then nobody should be using it, regardless of skin colour) but I didn't object to the language used in this film one bit. Because it was right to use such words, because such words were used at the time the film is set. Tarantino is striving for authenticity (the same thing that led him to actually strangle Diane Krueger in Inglourious Basterds) and he's achieved it. By sanitising the language, he would have undermined everything this film is about, everything that people like Django suffered. And that would have been wrong.

You know, I told myself I wasn't going to comment on that before I sat down to write this review, telling myself that the controversy surrounding the film was basically irrelevant to the film itself, but maybe it is more important than I thought. All I really want to say is that I enjoyed this film, I thought it was a good film and I wasn't in the least bit offended by it. And I don't really see how anyone could be genuinely offended by it.



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